Intentionally Designed Construction Center: Items to Add to Block Center Based for Specific Objectives

Intentionally Designed Block/Construction Center:intentionally designed thumbnail

Block play can be used to challenge, scaffold, and

extend children’s learning through the intentional

placement of additional accessories.

An intentionally designed block center encourages students to construct meaning of their world, to encounter problems and discover multiple solutions, to interact and share with others, to extend their creativity and to reflect on their discoveries.                                                                                                                    -D. Honegger

Examples to intentionally design the block/construction center to incorporate academic standards: (this is just a sample…)

life
Intentionally Designed Block Play for Life Sciences journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Life science:

artificial plants, plastic animals, felt and/or material, and accessories to build habitats for the animals

geography
Intentionally Designed Block Play for Geography journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Geography in Block Play journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Geography Provocations in Construction Play journeyintoearlychildhood.com

 

 

 

Geography: maps, road signs or the materials to make road signs, shower curtain laid out with grids, small wooden buildings or even individual cleaned out milk cartons to become buildings, Familiar signs, such as “One Way,” “School Crossing,” “Bus Stop”, “STOP”, tongue depressors for making fences, door and dresser knobs, small vehicles

natural elements
Intentionally Designed Block Play with Natural Elements journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Earth and environment: natural materials such as acorns, shells, rocks, pinecones, wood cookies, stumps, and twigs. Stumps are great for encouraging vertical building.

Provocations and FARMS Bundle STEAM and Dramatic Play (contains additional pieces including Farmer’s Market documents besides the provocations linked above)

20180927_132440
Intentionally Designed Block Play Incorporating Visual Arts journeyintoearlychildhood.com

 

Visual Arts: clipboard with markers, colored pencils to add designs to the structures and/or to make a “blueprint” or map of the structure.geometry

 

 

 

 

 

Geometry: 3D shapes (which rolls the best on a ramp- a cube, a sphere, a cone, a cylinder, etc.), tin cans, flat pieces such as a ceiling fan blade, long sticks (discuss parallel, perpendicular, diagonal, horizontal and vertical lines), tile or linoleum samples, PCV pipes. canning jar lids

physical
Intentionally Designed Block Center Physical Science journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Physical science: ramps, balance scales, pulleys, mirrors and pipes, buckets, magnets

Engineering: long flat pieces such as ceiling fan blades or pieces of plywood for building bridges, wooden spools, tin cans, hard cardboard toilet paper tubes, small cubes, knobs, candlestick holders

Provocations and STEAM Challenges: BRIDGES

engineering
Intentionally Designed Block Play Wide Range of Cognitive Skills journeyintoearlychildhood.com

 

 

 

 

Wide Range of Cognitive and Developmental Skills: hard hats, food containers, dollhouse people, steering wheel and any other materials that will encourage dramatic play within blocks to move students building, design, and play to a more complex level

Four and five-year-old children are very capable and independent. If manila and colored construction paper, a few crayons, scissors, masking tape, and string are always available in or near the block corner, the children will begin to make their own signs and draw trees, people, and other things they need, thereby using their imagination in a constructive, purposeful way.

  • Note: The above lists are simply suggestions. Obviously, no teacher will ever put out all these accessories at once. However, the larger your supply of odds and ends, the better you will be able to help the children in the block corner when they begin to need accessories for specific purposes.

intentionally designed block play

Author: DHonegger

Debra S. Honegger has worked in multiple areas of education- both general education and special education- as teacher, consultant, administrator and instructional coach- with ages from birth through adult. However, no matter where she is or what her title, she holds a firm belief in meeting the needs of each individual child while coming together as a community of learners.

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